Richard Melson

July 2006

Argonne National Lab

www.anl.gov

Argonne National Laboratory
9700 S. Cass Avenue
Argonne, IL 60439.
Phone: 630/252-2000

What's New at Argonne - July 2006

Carbon nanotube building blocks open up

possibilities for advanced electronics

A new method to systematically modify the structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes could expand their electronic properties and open the path to nano-electronics.

Per your subscription, here is your

July 2006 issue of What's New at Argonne:

Carbon nanotube building blocks open up possibilities for advanced electronics
A new method to systematically modify the structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes could expand their electronic properties and open the path to nano-electronics. Carbon cylinders a few billionths of a meter in diameter and a few microns long, these nanotubes are one of the strongest structures known and have unique electrical and thermal properties. See http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2006/MSD060630.html

First images made of hydrogen burning in working internal combustion engine
ARGONNE, Ill. (June 22, 2006) – Images of hydrogen combustion have been captured for the first time in an internal combustion engine operating at real-world speeds and loads by engineers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory. This window into the inner workings of a hydrogen-powered engine is helping to optimize the engines for street use some day. See http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2006/news060622.html

Visionary projects receive time on Blue Gene/L supercomputers at Argonne, IBM
ARGONNE, Ill. (June 16, 2006) – Computing projects ranging from understanding Parkinson's disease to modeling climate change have been awarded large amounts of joint time on Blue Gene/L computer systems at Argonne National Laboratory and IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, N.Y. See http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2006/MCS060616.html

Protein structure may lead to treatment for infection targeting cystic fibrosis patients
ARGONNE, Ill. (June 9, 2006) – Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have determined the structure of a key protein believed to play a role in a deadly infection that afflicts the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. This finding, published in today's issue of Science, may lead to a new drug to treat the bacterial infection. See http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2006/news060609.html

Membrane protein 'factory' may lead to new drug treatments
ARGONNE, Ill. (June 2, 2006) — Biologists at Argonne have engineered and patented a bacterial factory that enables the study of membrane proteins. These proteins are challenging to study, but critical to understand because they represent 60 percent of drug targets. Studies of membrane proteins could lead to new and improved pharmaceutical treatments for a broad range of illnesses such as depression, heart disease, addictions and cystic fibrosis. See http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2006/BIO060602.html

'Wild Chicago' takes a road trip to Argonne National Laboratory
ARGONNE, Ill. (June 2, 2006) — Argonne is featured on Wild Chicago, WTTW Channel 11's popular program that showcases area attractions. The program is airing on public television stations throughout Illinois during June and July. See http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2006/news060602.html

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What's New at Argonne - July 2006

Baurac, David M. Baurac@anl.gov to whats-new-at-a. Jun 29

Baurac, David M. Baurac@anl.gov

Jun 29, 2006

Argonne Research Facilities:

National User Facilities

Argonne designs, builds, operates and/or manages many scientific and engineering research facilities and makes them available to outside researchers from industry, academia and other government laboratories. Six of these facilities are official U.S. Department of Energy National User Facilities or User Centers:

Operated as national scientific resources, these facilities are sophisticated research machines that would be too expensive for a single company or university to build and operate. When research results will be published in the open literature, researchers may use these facilities without charge. When results are to be kept proprietary, a fee is charged for their use.

Ricketts Regional Biocontainment Laboratory

The University of Chicago's Howard T. Ricketts Laboratory is proposed for construction on Argonne National Laboratory's DuPage County campus. Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the Ricketts Laboratory is one of nine regional biocontainment laboratories that the National Institutes of Health plan to fund for the study of organisms important to national biodefense efforts as well as those causing emerging infectious diseases.

Other Argonne facilities available to outside researchers

Argonne has many other laboratories and research facilities that are also open to outside researchers from industry, academia and other national laboratories for a cost-recovery-based fee. On a negotiated basis, research results may be kept proprietary or published in the open literature at the user's discretion.

If you are interested in arranging research at one of the facilities on this list, but there is no live link or point of contact listed for further information, please send email to Argonne's Office of Technology Transfer or visit their home page.

Argonne National Laboratory
9700 S. Cass Avenue
Argonne, IL 60439.
Phone: 630/252-2000

What's New at Argonne - July 2006

Jun 29, 2006